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Program

tuesday 21 january 2003

0730-1730

REGISTRATION

0900-0930

OFFICIAL OPENING

0930-1030

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

WE ARE ALL AGREED THAT LIFE IS BETTER IN BOOKS
Stephen Coffman - Vice-President, Product Development, LSSI

Dostoevsky or Camus or was it Thomas Mann probably didn't have libraries and librarians in mind when they set down those well-known lines - but they do a fine job capturing the way many of us are feeling these days - even we haven't always had the guts to say it out loud. Libraries and librarians have always been about books, about collecting them, organizing them, and sharing them with our patrons. The problem is that much of the information in those books is increasingly becoming available in digital form where it may be accessed by anyone, anywhere and at anytime. And that has left many of us - and our funding agencies - openly questioning the role and the future of the library in the electronic age. In this talk we will try to take a look at some of the roles and strategies libraries have adopted to try to remain relevant in these rapidly changing times - and to honestly consider their chances of success. Finally, we will try to figure out who actually wrote that quote about 'life is better in the books' anyway. And to help do that, I'd like to suggest a little contest. So, if you think you know the right answer and you wouldn't mind having an extra US$50, please enter the exact quote, the source and your name at http://www.lssi.com/vrt/betterinthebookscontest (link no longer working). I will randomly select one winner from all the correct answers submitted, and award you $50 bucks right on stage - which means you must be present to win. Good luck and I'll see you all in January.

1030-1100

MORNING TEA AND EXHIBITION VIEWING

1100-1230

SESSION A:

CATALOGUING BY ANY OTHER NAME

1100-1125

A1: Exploring Taxonomy and Metadata for Better
Retrieval (To Be Confirmed)

1125-1150

A2: Capturing, Keeping and Providing Access to the Evidence of E-Government: a Work in Progress Report Card
Adrian Cunningham - Director, Recordkeeping Standards and Policy, National Archives of Australia

The internet has provided new, exciting opportunities to improve the means of public access to government information and services, while fundamentally transforming the way government works. The new technology, cultural changes aimed at 'cutting red tape' and the jettisoning the old 'process driven' approach to public administration, have greatly increased the speed and volume of information flow and decision making in the public sector. As the recent 'Children Overboard' incident has demonstrated, this new technology-assisted approach to governance can actually hinder rather than assist the cause of democratic transparency, accountability and openness unless adequate controls and systems are in place.

Archives and Records institutions such as the National Archives of Australia play an important role as enablers of efficient, transparent and accountable e-government through developing and promoting standards and policies for good recordkeeping, promulgating metadata standards for online resource discovery and recordkeeping and identifying and preserving records of e-government that are worthy of archival preservation. New challenges for recordkeeping professionals in the digital era, achievements of the past ten years, and outstanding issues and challenges for future collaborative action are addressed

1150-1215

A3: Creators become Cataloguers: Using E-learning to Implement Distributed Authoring of Metadata
Anne Parkhill - Librarian

In deciding on a distributed authoring model in metadata creation for web files, organisations are asking authors to not only move beyond creation to capture of their information but also to have an appreciation of why this needs to be done.

The allocation of metadata is high level 'cataloguing' which requires skills that a lot of creators don't necessarily have without training and encouragement.

Comprehensive metadata allocation asks also for different levels of understanding. eg. It is relatively easy to identify title of a web document and relatively difficult to identify best subject terms from a thesaurus. The author is trialing e-learning modules which can be used in organisations to train and mentor web authors for best practice in metadata use.

1100-1230

SESSION B: HOW THE ENGINES WORK

1100-1125

B1: Opportunities and Challenges of External and Internal Content Integration
Philip Garlick - Senior Vice President, OneSource Information Services Inc.

OneSource has been in the business of integrating textual and numeric content from numerous third parties for over decade and now we are leveraging lessons learned to help customers get their internal data into a format that will make it easier to derive valuable insights. Even more powerful are the types of high-impact analyses, which are enabled when both internal customer data and external market data are combined. This paper draws upon our experience and discusses the importance of content integration, where an organization might consider external and internal content integration, who benefits within the organization and user communities, how to plan for content integration, and what obstacles and challenges to expect.

1125-1150

B2: Factiva on Taxonomies - Delivering Information the Heart of Business
Anne Caputo - Director, Knowledge and Learning Programs, Factiva, a Dow Jones and Reuters company

This session will examine the importance of information architecture within a content management system.

1150-1215

B3: E-content Licencing and Consortia: is Sustainable Cooperation a Reality or Pipe Dream?
Mark Storm - Publisher Relations and Marketing Director, Swets Blackwell

The mere mention of licencing has the capacity to invoke dread within members of the library and information industry worldwide no matter what sector you're within. However 'restlessness and discontent are the first necessities of progress'. Licencing is also a function and requirement that has the capacity for shaping far-reaching innovation and success for everyone involved, small to large scale, library to consortia. This paper highlights experiences of licence management and relevant consortia, whereby creative models of multi-site or multi-organisation approaches, and our learnings, are discussed. You will be encouraged to think laterally about agents or intermediaries in an electronic environment, about their value and their future within the information chain.

1100-1230

SESSION C: USING NEW TECHNOLOGIES

1100-1125

C1: Adapting to New Technologies: PDAs and Wireless
Mary Peterson - Deputy, Library and Educational Information Services, Royal Adelaide Hospital / Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science

The RAH/IMVS Library has been looking at ways to integrate library databases and resources into the hand-held (PDA) environment. This session describes how information resources were assessed for their suitability for use on a PDA during a wireless trial of PDAs in SA major teaching hospitals. It meant becoming involved with the planning and rollout of patient care and documentation systems and discovering what information the users really wanted at the point of care, which moved librarians away from the traditional role of information provider. Adapting to wireless technology is more than just putting in another application. It requires a change in the way information is delivered and used, meaning a change in the work patterns of our clients and us. By sharing experiences and discoveries, the session introduces the audience to the potential uses of wireless applications for libraries, how to evaluate the types of PDAs available, discover which information resources might be useful for them and their clients and make informed decisions about adopting this new technology.

1125-1150

C2: Electronic Books: Not Dead Yet
Donald Hawkins - Director of Intranet Development and Editor-in-Chief, Information Science Abstracts, Information Today, Inc.

Electronic books (e-books) have been a subject of imagination since the 1940s, and, with the coming of the Internet, it seemed as if the dream was about to become a reality. A little over a year ago, the e-book world was a hive of activity that was marked by widespread and significant optimism. Major companies like Microsoft were developing e-book services.

Today, the e-book situation is markedly different and much less optimistic. The consumer market never developed into a viable business. Libraries are still trying to determine where e-books should fit in their offerings and whether their users want them. Microsoft is still working on its e-book development.

What does the future hold for e-books? Will they displace printed books, even to a small extent? What should libraries be doing in the e-book area? This talk will review the recent history of e-books and attempt to answer these and other questions.

1150-1215

C3: Technology Sold to the Highest Bidder! Now What? Know When to Walk Away, Know When to Run
Elaina Norlin - Associate Librarian, University of Arizona

Technology ultimately makes our life easier? Right? This common assumption has been with most libraries and its decision making process for the last several years. Yet how do we determine when to buy technology or when to reevaluate technology later when it is no longer useful? When you ask the common library, they usually do not have an answer. The outcomes from this presentation include:

1230-1400

LUNCH AND EXHIBITION VIEWING
Kindly sponsored by OneSource Information Services

1400-1520

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

1400-1435

WIN/WIN CONTENT NEGOTIATION
Corilee Christou - Director, Online and New Media

Licensing and Development Library users, publishers, licensors, licensees, aggregators, syndicators, publishers, authors - who owns what? What content do we need? What should we pay for it? How should it be delivered? This paper explores the 'information content jungle' and offers some guidance on how to negotiate content licensing deals so everyone wins!

1435-1510

E-JOURNALS - WHAT ARE YOU REALLY GETTING?
Carol Tenopir - Professor, School of Information Sciences, University of Tennessee

When libraries replace print journals with electronic versions they may not always be getting what they expect. This session will provide strategies to answer three important questions when considering replacing print with electronic: 1) is the title I need available electronically?; 2) what is included in the e-version?; and 3) can I cancel the print?

Other important issues will be raised, including how long will the e-version likely be available, what are the ongoing costs, and what impacts do electronic journals have on libraries and users?

1520-1600

AFTERNOON TEA AND EXHIBITION VIEWING

1600-1720

SESSION A: VIRTUAL REFERENCE

A4: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly? - Panel
Philippa Crosbie, Libby O'Reilly, Stephen Coffman, Stephanie McGlinchey and Sandra Dean.

A lively and informative panel covering the issues, systems and questions that Virtual Reference raises. The panel will consist of practitioners from the University of Sydney Library, the University of Technology Sydney Library, the Brisbane City Council Library Services and the Victorian Virtual Library along with Steve Coffman from LSSI.

1600-1720

SESSION B: WORKING TOGETHER

1600-1620

B4: Government Collaboration at Work: Cross Departmental Library Collection and Database Integration
Susan Rigney - Manager Library Services, Department of Justice and Attorney General and Leanne Cummings - Manager Library Services, Queensland Police Service

The Queensland Police Service (QPS) and the Justice and Attorney-General (JAG) Department Library Services are developing a collaborative network which will integrate and link their library and information resources. This initiative will facilitate the sharing, rationalisation and financing of information resources, technology and services in direct alignment with Queensland government policies - ASAP (Aligning Services and Priorities) and IJIS (Integrated Justice Information System). The proposed new service model for the QPS and JAG Libraries provides for a number of exciting opportunities including the provision of client access to an extensive collection, 24x7; and a mechanism to enhance efficiencies and effectiveness in the provision of library and information services.

1620-1640

B5: Partnering to Extend Collection Content
Naomi Krym - Business Development Officer, CISTI, National Research Council Canada

Because no library can rely on its own collection to meet all of its users' demands, there is a need to find ways to expand collection content. Partnerships are a natural means to this end. Just as in the case of many other relationships, partnerships may develop naturally or they may need to be actively pursued. The criteria that are necessary for a successful 'win-win' arrangement must first be understood and then clearly communicated to both parties to ensure that the needs of each organization are met. The challenge of providing seamless and transparent access to the resulting extended collection can be met through technology, workflow engineering and performance standards. This paper will present the theory and some examples from CISTI's experience as a partner in linking collections in order to provide a one-stop shop for documents from all disciplines to its clients.

1640-1700

B6: Digging Deeper than Google
Lynette Lewis - Regional Services Information, Yarra Plenty Regional Library and Pam Saunders - eBook Project Manager, Yarra Plenty Regional Library

In March 2002 Yarra Plenty Regional Library and Brisbane City Council Library formed the first Australian public library consortia to buy a collection of NetLibrary eBook titles. By May 2002 both libraries had integrated the NetLibrary titles into their catalogues and began to promote their use. This paper looks at some of the practical issues that had to be overcome specifically in introducing NetLibrary. Further analysis of the data resulting from use of this collection will be included. At Yarra Plenty this is part of our overall strategy to provide eResources that would not otherwise be obtainable via a Google search. That is more quality and less glitz. Information such as this is becoming known as the Deep Web.

1700-1720

B7: Consortia and Integrated Service Delivery
Heather Drummond - A/Manager InfoResearch (Library Services), Department of Primary Industries and Cathy Campbell - Project Manager (Knowledge Management), Corporate Performance, Department of Primary Industries

Queensland Government Library Consortium was formed to overcome the problem of insufficient funds and escalating prices. The consortium purchased information sources in areas of cross agency interest at extremely competitive rates. By purchasing access to only full text information sources with a web front end and an Internet delivery mechanism, the libraries have not only considerably reduced information costs but have also maximised flexible access to the information via their library intranets and internets and to all Queensland government officers around the world.

Through this highly coordinated, collaborative cross agency activity designed to harness collective purchasing and bargaining power, the librarians have achieved a consistently high level of integrated service delivery across all Departments.

1600-1720

SESSION C: E-JOURNALS

1600-1640

C4: Applying the Lessons Learned from JSTOR to the Digital Archiving Conundrum
Bruce Heterick - Director for Library Relations, JSTOR

Since 1995, JSTOR has been converting the backfiles of important scholarly journals, in a multitude of academic disciplines, from their paper origins to a digital archive. As a not-for-profit organisation, JSTOR's mission is to create a shared and trusted archive of important journal literature, regardless of whether that literature is pulp-based or 'born digital'. As we now begin to take on the varied challenges involved in receiving, enabling for display, and archiving content published electronically, we will draw from the extensive experience base we have developed from our seven years of work in creating and maintaining a substantial electronic database. While not all of JSTOR's experience in the retrospective conversion of paper journals is directly applicable to the digital world, we do believe it is reasonable to say that what we have learned to this point can be a useful guide in (1) asking the right questions, (2) challenging certain assumptions, and (3) creating a working model.

1640-1700

C5: The Impact of 'Pay-per-view' Micropayments on Australia's Information Providers
Beverley Forner - Managing Director, Thiri Pty Ltd

The pay-per-view market is a developing market in Australia. Thiri Pty Ltd has produced an online payment product and has also commissioned research in this area in order to assess consumer demand and expectations for paid online content, with particular reference to small payments (micropayments). This paper presents the key findings of this study and examines the potential impact of 'pay-per-view' on Australian information providers.

Thiri's online payment product, 'Pay by SNAP', transfers payments of any value over the Internet. It can be used to transfer value as 'pay-per-click', with electronic delivery of content following payment.

1700-1720

C6: Adding a Corner to the Triangle - Subscription Agents, Librarians and E-journals
Vicki Nicholson - Operations Manager, EBSCO Australia Subscription Services and Heather Layton - Manager, Library and Information Services, DSTO

Licencing and access issues for electronic journals are providing a headache for librarians and a service dilemma for subscription agents. Subscription agents have traditionally not become involved in negotiations regarding licencing, due to the complexity of decision making required to act on behalf of the library, along with the legal implications of such negotiations. However increasingly, librarians are turning to their subscription agents for help and advice.

EBSCO Australia and DSTO Research Library agreed to trial a service level agreement where EBSCO would attempt initial negotiations with publishers to provide multi-site access to DSTO's free-with-print online journal subscriptions. A model standard licence, based on the John Cox model, was developed for DSTO, and managed by EBSCO. This paper discusses the negotiation leading to the project, the processes employed, and the outcomes to date in dealings with publishers and ejournal licences. The presenters identify the benefits and pitfalls of the trial from their respective positions, and the implications for the strategic direction of both organisations regarding ejournal management.

wednesday 22 january 2003

0700-1730

REGISTRATION

0730-0845

BREAKFAST WITH SUPER SEARCHERS

Search v.t. 'look or feel or go over (person or his face or pockets, place, receptacle, book) for what may be found or to find something of which presence is suspected, probe'.
The Australian Concise Oxford Dictionary. 1987. p1007

Super Searchers '...are more than gatekeepers...they do know how to gain access to the treasure vault, but nobody's handed them a set of keys on a heavy iron ring. They have to pick the lock whenever they want to get in, and the tumblers turn differently every time...people who love to search are anything but proprietary about their hard-earned knowledge. They'll talk your ear off; just ask.'
Basch, R. Secrets of the Super Searchers. 1996, p.1

Breakfast with Super Searchers 'An opportunity to talk and share your knowledge with other Super Searchers over breakfast.' Information Online, Sydney, 22 January 2003, 0730-0845.

Entry by invitation only - make sure you RSVP to your invitation when completing Section E of the Registration Brochure.

0900-1000

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

THE CHANGING FLOW OF ONLINE INFORMATION - WHAT IT MEANS FOR BUSINESS, GOVERNMENT AND THE COMMUNITY
Ross Dawson - Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Advanced Human Technologies

The Internet and communication technologies have given rise to a society and economy dominated by the swiftly evolving global flow of information and ideas. Media is now a participative game as people freely publish and access the perspectives they prefer. To survive and thrive, businesses are creating new kinds of relationships with customers, suppliers, and partners based on transparency, collaboration and sharing value. For the community it is a big world when you only know your neighbours, but the new technologies with their connectivity are shrinking the world for those who are connected. For government there are challenges in ensuring equity of access, appropriate standards and infrastructure, and a modern approach to a national information policy. By understanding how these 'Living Networks' are reshaping society, information professionals can position themselves as leaders of the new environments and ensure their contributions are appreciated.

1000-1045

MORNING TEA AND EXHIBITION VIEWING

1045-1215

SESSION A: E-LEARNING

1045-1105

A5: Cutting Edge of E-learning
Marie Therese Van Dyk - Flexible Library Services Manager, Monash University and Richard Siegersma - Managing Director, Monash Learningfast

The practical reality of e-learning within a truly global environment is the focus of this presentation. Highlighted are case studies of organisations within the corporate and educational arena which have applied e-learning as a new delivery method for learning. Lessons learned from these encompass an appraisal of the critical success factors, the necessity to develop a learning platform incorporating an appropriate mix of technology, content and delivery. The presenters address the practical reality of collaborative learning in the global environment: one that factors in cultural, social, linguistic or digital divides. The paper will then zero in on the active and creative role libraries can play in interactive, collaborative and global e-learning.

1105-1125

A6: E-learning 24x7 at Your Desktop
Leanne Cummings - Manager Library Services, Queensland Police Service

The Queensland Police Service (QPS) Library provides information services to over 10 000 personnel stationed throughout Queensland. 85 per cent of these clients are considered remote, and are unable to physically access one of the three QPS libraries. The Virtual Library (VL) database was implemented in 1997 to enable clients to access, search and retrieve information resources from any QPS computer, regardless of their location or roster commitments. However, client demographics continued to hinder the delivery of equitable and cost-effective library literacy training. To overcome this challenge, a Computer-Based Training (CBT) program was developed for the VL in 2001. The VL CBT is an online tutorial that aims to teach clients in using the VL. Available 24x7, the VL CBT has provided the best solution in delivering equitable and economic library training to a large remote client base.

1125-1145

A7: Meeting the Challenge of Integrating Online Information Resources into the School Curricula
Alan Caters - Teacher Librarian, Brigidine College

To provide students with the research skills they will need to take into further education or the workplace, a familiarity with online information is required. If students are to fully integrate the use of online learning into their schema, then the online information must be seen to be both relevant and approachable. This will involve a synthesis of talents of both the classroom teacher and library staff working cooperatively together. Selection and evaluation remain two of the key competencies.

Of course there are problems, two of which are: resourcing of the technology and training of the staff. There remains a dichotomy between the expectation and resources provided to achieve it. Training of staff requires a commitment on the part of both the staff and administrations to enable all staff to mentor their students in effective online use

1145-1205

A8: Developing Teaching Strategies to Incorporate and Create Online Resources
Estelle Lewis - Consultant, Association of Independent Schools

The real challenge for educators relating to online resources is the need to integrate online information resources and information technology meaningfully into the school curricula.

1045-1215

SESSION B: INTRANETS

1045-1105

B8: ATSIC Information Initiative
Jeremy Hodes - Manager, Information Management Unit ATSIC

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) has developed the ATSIC Information Initiative. This has been designed to improve the Commission's information capability, and to provide an effective means of making and implementing better decisions about the management and use of information resources. A key component of the Information Initiative is the Information Cycle, which incorporates a submission process. This enables business areas to submit proposals to develop and improve their information capability, including reporting outcomes. The Information Cycle is aligned with the Budget Cycle. Information Partnerships have been established within ATSIC to create effective and sustained relationships between the demand for, and supply of, information resources.

1105-1125

B9: Far and Wide: Using an Intranet to Provide Information Services in a Government Department
Jennifer Kirton - Librarian, NSW Agriculture Wollongbar Agricultural Institute; Sean Brady - Librarian, NSW Agriculture, Network Services Unit Orange Agricultural Institute and Marsha Reilly - Librarian, NSW Agriculture Wagga Wagga Agricultural Institute

The NSW Agriculture library service uses the intranet to offer a range of information products to 2,220 staff at 97 locations. The web pages provide access to online journals, statistics, catalogues and FAQ pages. We can respond quickly to hot topics with subject specific information packages including daily/weekly updates. Advisory staff have been targeted by creating a Portal, bringing together both traditional library information and online services. Contents include statistics, online journals, lists of relevant books, journals and recent departmental publications and online request forms.

1125-1145

B10: ARCHI - Building a Network of Health Know-how
Dianne Easton - Information Manager, Australian Resource Centre for Hospital Innovations (ARCHI)

The Australian Resource Centre for Hospital Innovations (ARCHI) is funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing. ARCHI aims to collect resources in the area of clinical management and, in particular, tools for improving the process of patient care. ARCHI's niche is the grey literature - the reports, conference presentations, discussion papers, assessment tools and so on, produced in a wide variety of organisations - that may not be published elsewhere. ARCHI is moving towards becoming more selfsufficient by 2004. As part of that, a business plan identified the need to rebuild the website so that it more readily integrates all of ARCHI's information products. This web redevelopment began in April 2002 and the new website will be operational by July. The site is being built as a portal with integrated databases and will include a number of administrative functions that will enable more efficient sharing of information between all ARCHI stakeholders.

1145-1205

B11: A Week is a Long Time in Politics: Information Delivery in the Age of the Soundbite
Kate Curr - Manager, Systems and Information Resources, NSW Parliamentary Library and Gail Dunston - Deputy Parliamentary Librarian,Victorian Parliamentary Library

Parliamentary Libraries operate in an environment where information is both a tool and a weapon to their users. The demand from MPs for information that is both immediate and tailored to their requirements is high. This paper will talk about the ways that Parliamentary Libraries deal with this pressure and ways in which new technologies may be applied in the future.

1045-1215

SESSION C: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

1045-1125

C7: The Missing Knowledge Link
Mats Bjore - CEO, Infosphere AB

Knowledge initiatives often fail due to lack of top-level strategic involvement. Initiatives are often driven by middle management, usually following narrow department specific agendas. Uncoordinated duplicate efforts combined with an unquestioned belief in software and the latest buzzword accumulates high costs and little return. The leaders will need to develop skills that mixes knowing and doing in a balancing act between tactics and strategy. The future leader must own the qualities of having a tactical awareness combined with a forceful strategic decision capability. The leader must also create strategic awareness within the workforce, which must be empowered with the tactical decision skills. This paper will outline how and why the top-level decisions makers must be actively involved to create a co-ordinated knowledge strategy.

1125-1145

C8: IT meets KM - How Knowledge Management Can Support an Online Environment
Vicki Sellick - Information and Website Coordinator, B. Beacham - Research Officer and Elizabeth Kalucy - Co-Director and Research Fellow, Primary Health Care Research and Information Service

This paper discusses the redevelopment of a Web site from an on-line version of a printed brochure, to a useful tool meeting the knowledge management needs of stakeholders. Considerable information is generated by the research and development activities in general practice, primary health care and Divisions of General Practice. The Primary Health Care Research and Information Service (PHC RIS) is funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing to enhance communication by collecting and disseminating much of this data. Simply providing this information on-line is not knowledge management - organising this information into a useful format and communicating it in a way that meets stakeholder's needs is.

1145-1205

C9: Intelligence, Tradecraft and Technologies - Where do Librarians Fit in?
Andrew Ford - Managing Director, Epistemic Intelligence Australia Pty Ltd

This paper explores the interface between technology and an organisation's business, particularly focusing on the strategic decision-making process and the critical role of intelligence in this process. It outlines the intelligence process in detail and explains where the modern librarian 'fits' within this process, and how a variety of technologies and tools - particularly those that enhance collaboration and cooperation - haven't given the librarian an unprecedented opportunity to be part of an organisation's strategic decision-making process. The aim of the paper is to challenge librarians' perceptions of themselves - to move away from a defensive view of technology (something that either displaces or replaces them) to a more proactive view - where grasping emerging technologies can lead them to their rightful place: sitting alongside the strategic decision makers within the organisation.

1215-1345

LUNCH AND EXHIBITION VIEWING

1345-1515

SESSION A: INFORMATION LITERACY

1345-1515

A9: Information Literacy Programs - Panel Discussion
Deborah Turnbull, Fiona Salisbury, Madonna Scrase, Stephen Barnett. Chaired by Linden Fairbairn

An exciting panel comprising Information Literacy Practitioners from the University of Queensland Cybrary, the Information Division of the University of Melbourne, the North Point Institute of TAFE and South Australian TAFE Libraries.

1345-1515

SESSION B: ONLINE DIVERSITY

1345-1405

B12: Resource Discovery in the Knowledge Era
Kathleen Lazzari - A/g Manager, Knowledge and Enabling Services Centrelink

'Resource discovery' is a concept that sounds more like a fad than a foundation for the future. While it is not new to most educators and librarians, it is new to many working in information technology.

Through sharing aspects of the author's experiences in Centrelink, this paper explains the relevance of resource discovery to the online environment. It highlights the

1405-1425

B13: A One-Stop Shop for Information for the Women's and Children's Health Service
Tricia Scolaro - Head of Department Library and Information Services, Women's and Children's Health Service and Helen Archer - Serials and Systems Librarian Library and Information Services, Women's and Children's Health Service

The Library and Information Service of the WA Women's and Children's Health Service (WCHS) was responsible for the redevelopment of the Intranet. The Intranet is a one-stop shop for the broad range of information required to support the day to day activities of the WCHS. This paper outlines the strategic management of the redevelopment and the challenge of maintaining the currency, accuracy and relevance of the information. The provision of interactive training packages and the use of scripted journal passwords to provide wider access to electronic journals while complying with publishers' licencing restrictions will be examined.

1425-1445

B14: Size Does Count
Dianne Hodge - Librarian, Australian Maritme College

The Australian Maritime College (AMC) is scheduled to become Australia's smallest University in 2003. This presents unique challenges for our Library, specifically how does an institution of our size offer online services that can compete with those offered by larger institutions? The cost of subscriptions to online databases is prohibitive for an institution of our size, yet it seems essential to offer these services to attract students in a very competitive market. Is it possible in 2002 for a University Library to be competitive and not offer access to commercial full-text databases?

The paper will pose these questions and seek solutions from the practical examples of the AMC and other small tertiary institutions and from theoretical models.

1445-1505

B15: Cooler Runnings: the Origins, Capabilities and Future Direction of the Defence Library Portal
Iain Brown - Assistant Director Information Systems, Defence Library Service

The paper describes the current progress of the Defence Library Service (DLS) in developing an enterprise information portal in collaboration with a commercial partner. Current library systems contain debilitating design flaws that compromise information services delivery. They are compromising information services delivery and marginalising libraries. In tandem with other organisational and process rigidities and failings, they threaten extinction. The Portal addresses this by reflecting the social character of work and providing multi-faceted support for collaborative information seeking, sharing and use. The application is based on Lotus Domino, using its integrated support for messaging, groupware and workflow-enabled information management and collaboration to deliver an integrated, configurable 'dynamic workplace'. The Portal's core capabilities, search and retrieval, metadata and directory services are described.

Selected,integrated government-to-customer (G2C), peer customer and government-to-employee (G2E) Portal services are reported and compared and contrasted to other library portals reported in the literature. Its projected future re-development as a knowledge portal is briefly described.

The Portal is considered a highly apposite model platform for information services delivery in the corporate and government sectors.

1345-1515

SESSION C: DEEPER, WIDER, BROADER

1345-1405

C10: The 'Value Add' to Information
Babette Bensoussan - Director, The Mindshifts Group Pty Ltd

Great strides have been made in recent years in planning intelligence projects and collecting data, the same cannot be said for analysis, which is one of the more difficult roles an intelligence and information specialist is called upon to perform.

Analysis is the 'value add'. This session will provide an overview of the role of analysis and the variety of analytical techniques. The session will also review a matrix that will enable the information practitioner to quickly sort through the numerous methods of analysis available, and to select the appropriate analytical tool.

1405-1425

C11: Managing Desktop Access for Library Clients
(To Be Confirmed)

1425-1445

C12: The Challenges of Global Research in a Non-Global Information Environment
Mary Ellen Bates - Principal, Bates Information Services Inc.

We are faced with the challenge of providing global research to our patrons while the information environment is far from global in reach. Large portions of the world are barely covered in the online world; many countries' information culture run on the principle that 'it's not who or what you know... it's who will talk with you.' Information professionals within global enterprises face even more challenges, as not only are their requests global in scope but their patrons are also dispersed around the world. How do information professionals provide high-quality research services spanning the globe, given these limitations? This paper, building on interviews done for the author's book, Super Searchers Cover the World: the online secrets of international business researchers, provides tools and techniques for conducting research outside of one's geographic and cultural 'home.'

1445-1505

C13: Supporting Decision Making in Business
(To Be Confirmed)

1515-1545

AFTERNOON TEA AND EXHIBITION VIEWING

1600-1715

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

1600-1635

FILLING THE ON-LINE GAP - HOW TO SUPPLEMENT, SUPPORT AND ENRICH YOUR ON-LINE OFFERINGS
Dr Kate Andrews - Director Knowledge Management, BDO Kendalls

There is substantial and growing interest in the on-line medium because of the potential time and place benefits. Countering these benefits however the Knowledge Management discipline confirms that people remain the best source of deep expertise. We know from both theory and practice that knowledge transfer and capability development occurs over time through close person-to-person contact and direct experience. This session examines the potential for on-line approaches to support person-to-person knowledge transfer and capability development. The discussion will:

1635-1715

THE KEYS TO SUCCESSFUL STRATEGIC POSITIONING OF ONLINE INFORMATION SERVICES IN A KNOWLEDGE ENVIRONMENT
Anne Caputo - Director, Knowledge and Learning Programs Factiva, a Dow Jones and Reuters company

Knowledge exists in a complex business environment. Strategic positioning of online information services is critical to the successful creation of a knowledge rich environment. This session examines the keys to integrating online services into the work environment using the right combination of people, processes and technology. Use of the appropriate strategies can:

Provide a competitive knowledge edge. This presentation will discuss a variety of tools designed to prepare all the players in the 'information triangle' with the right strategies to create a successful knowledge environment.

1800-2300

CONFERENCE DINNER: GRAND BALLROOM

thursday 23 january 2003

0800-1730

REGISTRATION

0900-1000

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

THE INVISIBLE WEB: UNCOVERING INFORMATION SOURCES SEARCH ENGINES CAN'T SEE
Chris Sherman - President, Searchwise

Chris Sherman, one of the co-authors of 'The Invisible Web' will share the secrets all information professionals need to know - how to get the best from the Invisible Web, a treasure trove of authoritative, high quality information that general-purpose search engines like Google and AltaVista have difficulties finding.

1000-1045

MORNING TEA AND EXHIBITION VIEWING

1045-1215

SESSION A: NEW ROLES, NEW FUTURES

1045-1105

A10: Education and the Informational Professional
Sue Myburgh - Senior Lecturer and Program Director, Knowledge Management and Internet Communication Strategies School of Communication, Information and New Media Foundation Director, Centre for Internet Studies University of South Australia

Information professionals, and those who educate them, face enormous challenges. Increasingly easy access to communication media and information is altering perceptions of the very nature of information work, globally. There is no doubt that there are many challenges facing present and prospective information professionals. These include issues around internationalisation and accreditation; the level and structure of programs for first professional qualifications and competition from neighbouring disciplines. In this paper, I argue that a fresh approach needs to be taken concerning the growth and development of the NIP.

1105-1125

A11: The Lonely Librarian
Katie Blake - Product Specialist, Trimagic Software

Once upon a time a library was a hub of activity. People came into the library to read, to research, to consult with the librarian for reference and research questions. Librarians knew users' interests through direct human interaction. In the electronic age librarians are web page designers and portal managers. Users no longer come to the library in person, they want access to their libraries and their librarians from their desktops - 24 hours a day, every day. In this environment, how does the electronic librarian come to understand what their users want? How do we communicate with our users to be sure that we are adding value? This paper examines techniques for electronic communication, including online query analysers, web-based survey and feedback forms and portal management.

1125-1145

A12: What Makes Libraries Relevant in the 21st Century? Models of Distributed Access to Meet User Requirements
Roxanne Missingham - Assistant Director-General, Resource Sharing Division, National Library of Australia

For many centuries libraries have used well established means to develop collections and deliver services to their users. In the online environment we have created new access tools and services, framing our developments within our traditional understanding of user needs. The paper will explore the development of an approach to analyse the match between user expectations and library services, framing these within a three tier model of access in an online environment.

1145-1205

A13: 'Can You Cut the Mustard?' Professional Skills plus Personal Competencies Equals a Potential Career
Garry Conroy-Cooper - Partnering Manager, Information Management Staff by Zenith

What do employers in the 21st century need from qualified employees? What does the 'enabled' employee need to have on completion of a tertiary course? What are the professional skills and personal competencies that the public and private sectors are currently demanding across Australia? What are you doing about your continuing professional development? and What is the reality of recruitment in the Library, Information and Knowledge Management industry? Garry Conroy-Cooper, Zenith's Partnering Manager, will take you through a micro assessment of the Information Professional, and a macro assessment of the industry where that professional may have a career. Along the way, Garry will question a few paradigms, and have you assessing whether you 'can cut the mustard' in the 21st century!

1045-1215

SESSION B: PORTALS

1045-1105

B16: The One-stop Shop: a Single End-user Interface for Search and Discovery across Digital Library Collections (CSIRO)
Thomas Girke - Manager, Collection Resources Support; Jacqui Porter - Manager, Electronic Acquisitions and Rolfe Westwood - Manager, Database Integration, CSIRO IT Services

Australia's premier science organisation, CSIRO, is implementing an integrated tool to allow researchers to search across all types of information available to them in one step. Known as ENCompass, it provides a single gateway for access to information regardless of where it resides - the CSIRO OPAC, other OPAC's, abstract and indexing databases, full-text journal collections and digital repositories. This paper discusses the implementation and customisation of the system, its functionality as a product as well as the protocols that now allow users federated searching across resources.

1105-1125

B17: Smart Libraries Build Smart Communities in Queensland
Anna Raunik - A/Executive Manager, Digital Services Client Services and Collections, and Rachael Browning- Librarian, Internet Training, Public Library Services, State Library of Queensland

The State Library of Queensland has identified its commitment to develop a 'Smart Library Network' - an integrated net of both physical and virtual community spaces creatively linking diverse groups of Queenslanders to information, knowledge and each other. Strategies underway to meet this objective include: Queensland Information Portal - through the implementation of Voyager (Library Management Software) and ENCompass (Digital Library Software) Queensland Memories - providing web access to significant cultural resources of the John Oxley Library BHP Skills.net Roadshow Queensland - delivering community Internet training and education to over 2,000 participants in 25 rural and regional communities to date.

1125-1145

B18: Scholars Portal Project: Enhancing Access to High Quality Information Resources
Mary Jackson - Senior Program Officer for Access Services, Scholars Portal Project Manager, Association of Research Libraries

This presentation will summarise the project's background, the current state of implementations, future directions, related ARL activities that advance portal implementations in North American research libraries, and areas of potential collaboration with other portal initiatives globally.

1145-1205

B19: Subject Portals: Making it Easy for MPs to Find the Best Available Information Anywhere, Anytime
Amelia De Lorenzo- Development Manager, Parliamentary Library, New Zealand

Delivering the portals to MPs and their staff has provided a wide reaching desktop tool that ranges across all of the resources provided by the Parliamentary Library to its clients, both print and electronic. The portals make it more transparent to our clients the wealth of high quality authoritative information available on issues of interest to Parliament. Portal features include:

1045-1215

SESSION C: WEB DEVELOPMENT

1045-1105

C14: Rethinking Public Library Web Pages
Iain Hildebrand - Information and Development Team Coordinator, City of Charles Sturt Library Service

A survey of Australian Public Library Web sites reveals that very few libraries have gone beyond establishing Web sites that provide information about their static library resources and services. Few attempts have been made to deliver a high level of interactive library services to online clients. This paper examines some of the issues that public libraries need to consider in order to rethink the way that the Web can be better used to provide interactive, real time online services. Issues include:

1105-1125

C15: Building a Web Site to Attract Young Adult Library Patrons
(To Be Confirmed)

1125-1145

C16: SiWvl - the Development and Growth of a Cooperative Web Site
Indira Gonsale Korale - Systems Librarian, Leichhardt Library and Ellen Forsyth - Consultant, Public Libraries Branch, State Library of New South Wales

SiWvl - the Sydney Inner West Virtual Library is an account of the development and growth of a cooperative web site. This site is the result of a cooperative approach between public libraries in 5 separate Council areas. After the initial set up of content was completed by Ellen the site was launched in 2000. Since then, further functionality has been added by using AIMs, a commercial software package, which has resulted in a change in the architecture of the pages. This has facilitated multiple updating from dispersed sites. Passwords are set up for each location. Input is decided on a cooperative basis, depending on the area of expertise.

1145-1205

C17: Technology Developments in Pursuit of the Universal Search Engine
Bette Brunelle - Executive Vice President, Ovid Technologies

Once it was enough to link all resources using the web model - now a universal search engine is increasingly a goal for information managers. Whether you've got your money on Google or Teoma; a portal vendor; a peer-to-peer system; standards and standards-based initiatives (such as the Open Archive Initiative, z39.50 or CrossRef); or new technologies (such as Web Services or SOAP), chances are you face a constituency of users who expect all resources to be searchable with the same ease as 'all' web sites. This session will present a high-level survey of technologies, standards and issues involved in actually accomplishing a universal search engine.

1215-1345

LUNCH AND EXHIBITION VIEWING

1345-1415

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

WHAT ROLE CAN A NATIONAL LIBRARY PLAY IN DEVELOPING INNOVATIVE COLLABORATIONS AND SERVICES? TWO PERSPECTIVES FROM THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS AND THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA
Diane Kresh - Director, Public Service Collections, Library of Congress and Elizabeth Dracoulis - Director, Reader Services National Library of Australia

The authors focus on the Library of Congress's role in building the Collaborative Digital Reference Service (CDRS) now called QuestionPoint, and on digital reference initiatives pursued by the National Library of Australia. The paper highlights the opportunities and challenges that exist for National Libraries seeking to foster innovative, collaborative services. As networked services seek to expand internationally, and libraries seek partners outside their geographic boundaries, libraries must address the complexities of a variety of issues, including:

1420-1500

SESSION A: INFORMATION LEADERSHIP

1420-1440

A14: Clark Kent and Lois Lane in 2010 - Information Professionals Working in the 'Technology Fashion House'
Rob McEntyre - Director, Robert McEntyre and Associates Pty Limited and Ruth McIntyre - Manager, TAFE Learning Resources Systems Project

The year is 2010. Clark Kent and Lois Lane once worked as reporters for a publisher 'The Daily Planet'. They now work as 'Business Architects' in the 'Technology Fashion House', an organisation that relies heavily on international knowledge, technology and e-relationships. Clark and Lois reflect on the environment and drivers that led them to their new roles in a new organisation in a new business environment, and their development since 2003 that included an on-line and personalised vocational Masters degree in 'Entrepreneurial Information Management'. This program involved several international universities and major 'information' vendors, which provided access to guidance and expertise in:

1440-1500

A15: Information Leadership - Avoiding the Perfectionist Trap!
Paul Shea - Principal Consultant, AMS Access

A window of opportunity presently exists for information professionals to re-position themselves as natural leaders of the information revolution (circa 1990) and achieve wider recognition, application and compensation for their skills. The current disaffection with IT means that information professionals have an opportunity to become champions of a balanced approach to information and leading the process of dissemination and diffusion of infoskilling. Information professionals can promote the idea of information capability or information IQ, for individuals and organisations, as a means of avoiding the perfectionist trap, which is the paradox that the better the service you provide the less it tends to be noticed, service being intangible. People tend to recognise bad service much more than good service!

1420-1500

SESSION B: PORTALS

1420-1440

B20: A New Model of Collaborative Library Service: the AARLIN Portal Project
Edward Lim - Assistant Project Director, La Trobe University and Earle Gow - Librarian, La Trobe University

The AARLIN Portal Project, supported by the Australian Research Council is a collaborative project involving 20 Australian universities and the National Library of Australia. Its principal aim is to develop a structure and framework for providing unmediated, personalise and seamless end user access to the analogue and digital resources of Australian university and research libraries from workstations of research staff and students. This paper will outline the outcome of the Pilot portal project which involved six of the participating universities and their academic staff and researchers, and also deal with the implementation phase, which has received $2.8 million funding under the Federal Government. The technologies underpinning the project will be explored and explained. Finally, the paper will deal with the advantages and disadvantages of such a collaborative approach as well as the legal and administrative framework that will ensure the long term viability of this collaboration.

1440-1500

B21: The Answer to All Our Problems
David Groenewegan - Library Portal Administrator Systems Support Unit, and Simon Huggard - Systems Librarian Systems Support Unit, Sir Louis Matheson Library Monash University

In semester 1 2002 Monash University Library trialed Fretwell-Downing's ZPortal software. This software was designed to create seamless access to all the library's electronic online resources. Monash was one of the first libraries in the world to use the ZPortal software. The paper will discuss the reasons for adopting a portal, what was expected of the software, and the aims of the trial. In addition some outcomes of the trial will be discussed, as well as the practical maintenance issues that a system of this nature creates.

1420-1500

SESSION C: WEB USABILITY

1420-1440

C18: The Development of a Usability Checklist
Roz Raward - Lecturer, Information Studies, Course Convenor, Masters in Internet Communication, School of Information Management and Tourism, University of Canberra

Much has been written about web site design in general, but little has been written to provide academic library web site managers with the relevant guidelines required to design usable web sites that meet international standards. However, surprisingly little has been discussed in the literature about methods that are available to provide academic library web managers with a simple usability testing tool that can be used throughout the design and maintenance life cycle of the ongoing web site design process. The study is significant because it discusses the development of a user centred evaluation method that can be used by library web masters to design and evaluate their library web sites in order to achieve international best practice standards. It also examines a representative sample of Australian academic library web sites and provides for the first time in Australia, a detailed study of the standards of these web sites with the ultimate aim of contributing to the design of effective user-centred web sites.

1440-1500

C19: You Have a Great Website So Why Can't People Find It?
Andrew Osborne - Contractor

Is your website search engine friendly as well as user friendly? Search Engines and Directories are like the yellow pages of the Internet. Statistics show that, depending on your industry, up to 82% of potential customers will try to use a search engine or directory to try and find your website. Common website design practices make many websites invisible to search engines or effectively hide the content. This paper looks at how to avoid the ten traps of website design that make most websites extremely difficult for potential users to find and what are the questions you should be asking your web designer.

1500-1530

AFTERNOON TEA AND EXHIBITION VIEWING

1530-1600

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

DEMONSTRATING THE VALUE OF LIBRARIES AND ONLINE INFORMATION PROFESSIONALS
Amelia Kassel - President, Marketing Base

Many librarians and information professionals are clamoring to learn strategic and proactive measures for proving their value. Although information centres have been said to be 'institutional assets', transforming libraries into recognized corporate assets that affect the bottom line is challenging. In this session, Amelia Kassel, industry journalist and expert researcher highlights practical tips and guidelines for explaining and communicating value. Amelia describes methods for determining return on investment (ROI) and suggests how today's savvy librarian can go over and beyond previous generations by identifying and tracking their contributions, and conveying them effectively to both stakeholders and upper management.

1600-1700

PANEL DISCUSSION

THE ROLE OF THE INFORMATION PROFESSIONAL
Chaired by Stephen Coffman

Every sector of the Australian community - from recreation to defence, from learning to business, from science to law - thrives on good quality, relevant, easy to find information. Information Technology and the Internet now provide a brilliant and economical infrastructure, and consumers now benefit from being able to search the World Wide Web. But the Web is not the total answer for all information needs, and should be used wisely. This panel of eminent speakers from different sectors in the information industry will discuss the roles Librarians and Information Professionals must be equipped to play so that Australians have access to good quality relevant easy to find information.

1700-1715

OFFICIAL CLOSE

1715-1800

FAREWELL DRINKS


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